Hope always,

I gave up on my childhood friend Melissa Baker back in October 2014. I had driven a few hundred kilometres to see her face to face after some worrying online conversations.

Mel was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s Lymphoma exactly six months after my breast cancer diagnosis back in 2013 and began writing the blog I Got The Good Cancer.  We referred to ourselves in jest as Kylie Minogue and Deltra Goodrem, Australian popstars that shared our cancers. We joked that there was something toxic in the school playground we shared all those years ago.

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I’m just starting chemo, Mel yet to know she has cancer early 2013.

When I arrived at her home and walked up the stairs to her front door, I glimpsed her through the window. Her skeletal frame took my breath away. With the spark gone from her eyes and plagued with respiratory infection after infection, Mel had no immune system and no further treatment options offered to her.  I honestly started to grieve for her demise.

This 39 year old, brilliant forensic pathologist and single mum to two beautiful kids had so, so much left to contribute.

I cried all the way to her house and all the way home from that visit. By the time I reached my city, my eyes were so swollen I could hardly see the road ahead.

When Mel’s treatment team gave up on her she sacked them and moved to another Melbourne hospital. Her new hematologist was at the forefront of a melanoma drug trial to treat lymphoma and Mel ensured she was the first Australian on that trial.

Not content with this last attempt to save herself, she has worked tirelessly to advocate for other lymphoma patients who are in the same dire position she was. She helped recruit and connect patients to the trial who had been offered no hope, and has given them much more time with their families. She no doubt will one day be credited with being the integral link that alongside the drug and doctors, saved their lives.

Two years on, Mel is in remission, and as she approaches the last eight months of the trial. she doesn’t know what the future holds beyond it. The drug is so new no one is able to yet talk of it as curative.

Mel is unbeleiveably relentless in her quest to raise enough money to fund the first specialist lymphoma nurse for Australia’s fifth most common cancer in which 5000 new Australians will be diagnosed with the next 12 months.  By comparison, The McGrath Foundation for breast cancer currently has 110 nurses nationally supporting patients and their families.

I’d like to sincerely apologise to my friend for prematurely losing hope. The lesson here is there is ALWAYS hope.

Love and hope always Mel,

Lise x

Mel will host a fundraising event dubbed “Not Your Average Trivia Night” at Frankston RSL’s Simpson Room on Friday, November 11, from 7pm.  The event includes live music, three course meal, raffles, silent auctions and more. Tickets are $75.

For details, email igotthegoodcancer@gmail.com

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Read all about Mel’s courageous story in print here.


5 Comments on “Hope always,”

  1. Marita says:

    Check out the Catherine WOTTON Scholarship Fund. Just google. We raised $120,000 and thought about funding one or more nurses but decided to give scholarship so that more nurses can study gyne oncology. I think the money goes further this way. Marita van Gemert.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Trish MLDB says:

    I wish her EVERYTHING .
    Hope is everything.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. […] post by Lisey celebrating hope and […]

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